Using the Text Editor with MarkDown

How to Edit Text in Studyworx 3

There are many text editing fields scattered throughout Studyworx 3. They do not appear to do anything at first glance, but behind the scenes there is a powerful formatting tool at work called MarkDown.

MarkDown is a simple text formatting tool that allows you to format documents simply by adding small but significant marks in front of any text that you wish to format.

It is important to realize that MarkDown can be used almost anywhere in Studyworx.

This means that you do not need a giant toolbar of icons to format text, you simply use MarkDown anywhere you have a text editing box and your text will be formatted when viewed.

Markdown Techniques

What is Markdown?

Markdown is an easy way to format your documents without having to constantly highlight text and click buttons.
To use markdown you just add a few markers to your text and it will appear as nicely formatted text as soon as you save it. It even looks good as is

Adding Headings

To add a heading just put a pound sign(s) in front of your text. You can add up to 6 pound signs which will represent Headings 1 - 6.

# Heading 1
## Heading 2
### Heading 3
#### Heading 4
##### Heading 5
###### Heading 6

And these headings will look like the following when you view them.

Heading 1

Heading 2

Heading 3

Heading 4

Heading 5
Heading 6

Adding other formatting

Beside headings there are many other formats available. Here is an important rule.

To change formats always add a blank line above the text you wish to format.

If you ever have a line that does not seem to format itself as expected, add blank lines above and below.

Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic

You can use either * or _ to create the above formats it's really easy.

*Italic*
**Bold**
***Bold Italic***
_Italic_
__Bold__
___Bold Italic___

Either of the above produce the following it's just a matter of preference:
Italic
Bold
Bold Italic

Indents and colors

To add indented text you simply need to add a > to the beginning of the first line.
It's as easy as this.

> Indented text begins like this...
More indented text.
   < This blank line ends indentation >
A fresh un-indented line

This is what results from the above:

Indented text begins like this...
More indented text.

A fresh un-indented line

Adding Colored Indented test

To use colored text do the following:

> This is indented black text.
>> This is indented Green text.
>>> This is indented Red text.

This is indented black text.

This is indented Green text.

This is indented Red text.

This is the same as the above:

>
Black indented text.
>>
Green indented text
>>>
Red indented text.

Adding a Horizontal line

To draw a horizontal line across the page simply add 3 minus signs.

---

This will make a nice looking line across the page.


Making Literal text.

To make text formatted exactly as you type it use a "code block".


~~~use three tilde's above

    *
     ^
    ===
  ========
 | <>  <> |
 \    |   /
    ~~~~
    \  /
     "" 
~~~use three tilde's below 
to "fence in" your literal text.

Any text between these two lines of tilde's will be formatted just as it is typed and it will be contained in a box, just like the text above.

Adding Bullets

To make bulleted text you just add a * with a space following and you will get a bullet.
(make sure you have a blank line over the first bulleted line)

* Bulleted Text 

This produces the following:

  • Bulleted Text

Nested Lists
Bullets and Numbered lists can have many layers.

* First level Bullet text
    * (Add 4 spaces in front)
        * (Add 8 spaces and so on)

This will produce the following:

  • First level Bullet text
    • (Add 4 space in front)
      • (Add 8 spaces and so on)

You see that even without formatting it is perfectly readable as a nested list.
Numbered lists work just like bulleted lists only you start each line with a number a period and a space.
(Leave a blank line over your numbered lists too)

1. First level numbered list.
    1. Second level
    2. (use four spaces)
        1. Third level
        2. (use 8 spaces)
2. Another first level

This produces the following:

  1. First level numbered list.
    1. Second level
    2. (use four spaces)
      1. Third level
      2. (use 8 spaces)
  2. Another first level

Creating Links to web pages

There are several ways to create links to web pages, I will give you three which should be enough to handle almost any circumstance.

auto-links

Links will automatically be created whenever you enclose a web address in <>
Example:


<http://quickworx.info>

The above will produce:

http://quickworx.info

For references and footnotes this is often the quickest and clearest way to create links that give the address, as well as a direct link to the site.

Named Links

What if you want a nice name for a long ugly link? There is another way.


[Sweet happy named link](http://studyworx.net)

The above will produce:

Sweet happy named link

But what if you want to put a long ugly link in the middle of a sentence and you don't want it to look terrible?

Referenced Links

A referenced link allow you to use a link in a sentence without making your sentence a total mess.


    Check [here][1] for the answer.

    Then anywhere later, usually at the end 
    of your document add the link like this:

    [1]: http://studyworx.net "pop up text"

The above will produce this:

Check here for the answer.

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